Ok, so this was originally posted as a comment to Danny Anderson’s review of the film.

SPOILERS
SPOILERS
SPOILERS
SPOILERS
SPOILERS

Ok… So Danny’s sort of focused on Thanos’s godlike power making him very much “God” with a capital G… as opposed to just “a god” with a lower case G.

My response was this:

I had marked this to respond to when I saw you post it the other day. Obviously (since I know you read my review already) you know that I’ve seen the film twice. And I have difficulty rating it as a movie given the uniqueness of what it is… I focused on it’s franchiseness because that’s what the next podcast is going to be. And I also touched briefly on it’s philosophical question of of utilitarian moral objectivism vs. relativism.

But you offer an interesting theological philosophical question that I can’t address in my review because I was avoiding spoilers where you allowed them. Or at least your take leads me to a question that I wanted to pose but can’t.

Namely, Thanos’s plan is ultimately kind of short sighted and pointless. If we grant him that he has the superior moral stance in the objectivism argument that I posed and that he really is the hero in his quest to maintain balance in the universe, but take the diegesis of the film as given that he does have infinite Godlike power (after all, they’re called infinity gems) then his plan is dumb. Yes, he has temporarily staved off the problem of resource allocation by halving consumption. But that solution is fleeting in that he’s done nothing to stop the problem from recurring. If the universe is 6 billion years old, and we assume that earth’s population growth patterns are relatively average for the universe, then we can assume that we’d be exactly back at the same place as we are now in about 60 years or so… which is infinitesimal in the 6billion year history.

Possessing infinite power, he could have just as easily doubled the size and resource allocation of the universe and achieved the exact same solution with zero opposition. Of course the 60 year problem would persist. But it does now, so who cares… or raise allocation to the infinite power. I mean, why not…

Of course this calls to question why a just God doesn’t do this anyway. This could be argued that Judeo-Christian God simply doesn’t want to… free will and all that… but Thanos apparently doesn’t have the same moral code as JCG. So why not? Perhaps the power of Infinity isn’t really infinite at all. And he couldn’t do that. But that still leaves a problem. For a being who is effectively infinite in power by human reckoning, the idea that he has staved off the problem that is so important to him that he was worth it “costing him everything” just to extend the viability of the universe by 0.000001% seems ridiculous.

Why not half the population, then sterilize it and grant immortality? Something… there just needs to be more involvement than the solution provided of “one time fix and then I’m gonna go hang out and watch sunrises.” This sort of calls into question some of the utopian god questions we were discussing offline after we recorded my podcast.