* you and I had previously discussed the action scenes, so of course I agree completely. I think that the bullet time effects have much greater impact when used sparingly. Blake gets thrown out of a window, Jon gets his intrinsic field removed, then fine, slow me down. Punching a random thug or incidental fighting in a prison brawl, should happen at lightning speed. Screen time as well. Jon and Laurie’s fight with the muggers should have taken 60 seconds of screen time tops.

* Another review I read made a really good point about the movie. It’s not really an adaptation. It’s an homage. It was an attempt to say to all the fanboys out there, “you’ve always wanted to see Watchmen on the big screen! Well now you can!” The problem is, you and I are atypical fanboys, I guess. We’d much rather see an actual good film. Despite all of confirmed below that not having read the book, she was really confused by the movie, and that’s a problem. She happens to be a big old geek and will likely read the book now anyway, but I’d rather people come out of an adaptation of an epic saying “wow, I really have to read that book now to see more of that world” not “oh, umm… that was neat, I guess.” I expect most of the non-geek population would fall into the latter category.

* Had I been tasked with writing a big screen adaptation, I’d have shortened it another 40 min. or so. I would have removed present-day Hollis from the film entirely, as without his death, the hanging out with Dan scene is meaningless. I would have removed Rorschach’s origin flashback, as they only told the second half, and while I agree that it’s one of the coolest scenes in the movie, it doesn’t serve any story purpose unless we see the first half of the origin. It just tells us “rorschach is nuts! here’s why!” It doesn’t give us transition or growth. We already knew he was nuts, we don’t really need to know why (in the movie context). I probably would have beefed up Laurie’s character a little bit. Blake being her father more or less comes completely out of left field and has very little impact. In the book, it’s clear she HATES Blake. In the movie, she almost seems ambivalent to him up until then, other than when she’s directly confronted with it while speaking to her mother.

* A trilogy might have worked, but I think it’d have been hard to cut in the LOTR style since the breaks aren’t as natural (despite it coming out as a limited series). I’d rather have seen a 5 part miniseries on SCIFI or something. I actually think that was the right medium. I could do without Hollywood style special effects in a story like this, as I’d rather give the characters breathing room. The effects budget of a Galactica episode would have been more than sufficient for each installment.

* Fights. Again, agreed.

* Sex in the clouds. I think this is important, but it was just done badly. First, I didn’t think they made it clear enough that Dan was impotent the first time Laurie tried to jump his bones. It just felt awkward (“I need a moment”) not embarrassing. Second, I think Snyder was trying to be HOT, but failed miserably. It was WAY less successful than your average late night Cinemax romp, and that’s troubling. In particular, the slow pan up Laurie’s legs to show that OMGSHESSTILLWEARINGTHEFUCKMEBOOTSANDTHEYREACTUALYFUCKINGHAWTHAWTHAWT!!! was just laughable. If I were a 13 year old boy, then maybe I might have jacked off to that. But I’m not and it just seemed silly and overtly wankerish.

* Jokes, I dunno. In general I did feel that the dialog comes across as awkward. People in comic books just don’t talk like people in films. And neither talk like people in real life. They tried very hard to use script lines directly from the book and it just seemed forced. I don’t know that jokes would have helped, but a good rewrite would have done wonders.